Monday, July 27, 2009

PULITZERS LOST, WHAT A COST - Fifth in a series on the impact of thousands of job cuts at America's newspapers

What does it tell us that a passionate voice like Jerry Kammer’s is no longer supported by a newspaper? In 2006, two Pulitzers were awarded for National Reporting. The New York Times won one, and the other was won by The San Diego Union-Tribune and Copley News Service, “with notable work by Marcus Stern and Jerry Kammer, for their disclosure of bribe-taking that sent former Rep. Randy Cunningham to prison in disgrace.”

This series, “Pulitzers lost, what a cost,” explores the impact of thousands of journalists losing their jobs by asking some of those who have shown themselves capable of producing work of the highest caliber - winners of the Pulitzer Prize who are no longer at a newspaper - for their reflections on what happened to them and how they view the future of journalism. Mr. Kammer’s is the fifth interview.

Previous interviews: Deborah Nelson, Andrew Schneider, Kim Komenich and Janet Reeves.



1. Name: Jerry Kammer
Age: 59
Last news organization: Copley News Service

2. What work did you winner Pulitzer for, when?

Our story was a Washington political scandal whose central figure was Rep. Randy “Duke” Cunningham. We told how he was bribed by defense contractors for whom he stuffed earmarks into appropriations bills. We also told the story of a broader network of politicians who provided earmarks while collecting big campaign cash not only from the contractors but also from the lobbyists hired to represent the contractors. It was a story of a perversion of democracy by a system twisted by the relentless need for campaign cash. The decadent excess of several of these guys added spice to the mix.

Here are the stories that were recognized with the 2006 Pulitzer for National Reporting:

Story 1.

Story 2.

Story 3.


3. Why did you leave your paper? When?

This is a little complicated. I took a buyout from the Copley News Service at the end of 2007, about a year before they closed the Washington bureau, where I worked. A few months later, I got a call from an editor at the Arizona Republic (where I had worked for 16 years) asking if I’d be interested in a part-time job helping to cover the election. So I worked from April through the election in November. Officially, I was employed by Gannett News Service, but nearly everything I did was for the Republic.

4. What are you doing now? Any reflections on life after newspapers?

I’m now doing research and writing for the Center for Immigration Studies, a DC think tank that advocates reduced immigration. I miss working with other reporters. I miss the buzz of digging. But I feel fortunate to be working on an issue in which I have been interested ever since I was a correspondent in Mexico for the Republic from 1986-1988. Here's where you can find my blog.

5. What do you hope to do going forward? Will you stay in journalism? How?

I’m hoping to do useful work at CIS. Our country needs an open, honest debate on immigration policy, which I have observed since I was the Arizona Republic's correspondent in Northern Mexico from 1986 to 1988. I’d like to provide good information to help inform the debate. I have two fundamental concerns about immigration trends of the past 30 years. First, we are on track to double our population in the next century, a frightening prospect but one welcomed by the employers of low-wage labor, who have formed an ad hoc coalition with some liberal groups to push for "comprehensive" reforms that will further accelerate the growth of our population. Second, the steady rise of illegal immigration of poorly educated people from desperate regions of the Third World is importing a new underclass. Many of these migrants are willing to work hard for poor pay at the bottom rungs of an economy that is losing many of its middle rungs. They are employed by businesses that grow wealthy, while pushing onto the rest of society heavy costs for health care, schools and social services. The process is widening the gap between rich and poor and threatens to bring us the social structure of Latin America. I'd like to provide information that will help inform the immigration debate. My motto for writing about immigration remains what it was when I was a reporter: Always hard-headed but never hard-hearted. Every immigrant has a story. But as Barbara Jordan said when she chaired a federal commission on immigration reform, we need an immigration policy that serves the national interest. Out thinking about immigration should be guided less by nostalgia for our grandparents and more by concern for our grandchildren.


6. What has the downsizing of your former newsroom or closing of your former paper meant to the quality of journalism in your community? For example, are there types of stories not being told? You could use your own experience to provide examples here.


The closing of Copley’s DC bureau (which at the end was the bureau of Copley’s flagship paper, the San Diego Union-Tribune) means that San Diego has no eyes to concentrate on its congressional delegation in DC. It means the paper would have missed the Cunningham scandal had it developed a few years later. But there are some fine reporters and editors who remain in San Diego after the brutal downsizing. I’m pulling for them. I’m also pulling for my old colleagues at the Arizona Republic. We had a great I-team there, back in what we Old Timers will always think of as a golden era, when we had a sense of mission and the money to carry it out. But that era started to fade well before the recession, craigslist and the Internet-writ-large began tossing neutron bombs into the newsroom. When Gannett bought the paper, they turned Arizona into a colony. As history shows, the purpose of a colony is not to provide for the well-being of the natives; it is to generate profits for the home country, which in this case was Gannett corporate headquarters. In the relentless pursuit of a greater return on investment, they siphoned off resources that had previously been spent on reporting, on making the paper the ARIZONA Republic and not just the Metro Phoenix News You Can Use If It Doesn’t Piss Off the Real Estate Industrial Complex. (Thanks for that name to Jon Talton, the tremendously talented columnist let go by Gannett because he kept on pissing off the REIC). The staff suffered layoff after layoff, and the quality of the paper declined in tandem. But I’m still pulling for the staff that remains, including some first-rate reporters and editors. They’re terribly overworked, but they’re making a great effort.


7. What, if anything, do you think your newspaper should have done differently to prevent the downsizing or closure that cost you your job?

I’ll take the question as an invitation to a utopian vision of newspapers. The best thing that could have happened would have been for newspaper ownership to have remained in the hands of local families who had a sense of noblesse oblige, who were more concerned about being members of their communities than about maximizing profit. Capitalism is a wonderful system, when the drive for profit is restrained by a sense of social obligation and rigorous regulation. Corporate ownership of newspapers has ripped the soul out of many newspapers. Look at what happened to the papers in Phoenix, Louisville, DesMoines et al after they were bought by Gannett. The Gannettoids aren’t uniquely guilty. They’re just part of the steady ascendancy of buccaneer capitalism in our country. Look at Wall Street, where the bastards went wild with the smiling benediction of Alan Greenspan, whose every non-move was directed by the Gospel of Ayn Rand. Look at our gargantuan food industry, especially the meat processing giants who have relentlessly driven down workers’ real wages while increasingly depending upon an easily exploitable workforce of illegal immigrants. Look at our Congress, where the drive for campaign cash puts our democracy up for sale to the big-money-boys who know how the game is played: Hire the right lobbyists and make the right campaign contributions and Washington is yours. We’ve got government of the lobbyist, by legislative machinations like earmarks and regulatory nips and tucks, for the campaign cash. Mr Lincoln would not approve. But he’s the man who said that “we here highly resolve…” Does anybody highly resolve anything these days—except to get re-elected or pick up that mega-huge year-end bonus?

I see I’ve turned this into a rant. I’ll wrap it up with this: I used to think my politics were moderate or slightly left-of-center. But the perversions of capitalism that I’ve seen during my career as a reporter (including several years covering Charlie Keating and the plundering of the S&Ls) have persuaded me that Karl Marx was right when he said capitalism would be destroyed by its own excesses. The excesses that continually torment our society are devastating in their cumulative, debilitating, demoralizing effect. We need to see our actions today through the lens of Americans 50 or 100 years from now, who will be dealing with the consequences of what we do today. One of journalism’s jobs is to craft that lens, to stimulate that crucial American capacity for self-criticism and self-correction. God bless the reporters and editors who take on that job. God bless the media owners who provide them the means to do it.



8. What would you advise young people wanting to pursue a life in journalism today?

I would definitely encourage a young person who likes to write and who believes that good journalism is a vital public service to enter the field. But I'm a little concerned about this intern culture that has evolved, in which young people who have both connections and talent want to start at a big paper and stay there. There are tremendous opportunities to do good work and to learn every aspect of our craft at small newspapers. I am so glad that my first newspaper job was at the Navajo Times, in Window Rock, AZ. I'd encourage young people to develop an interest in a particular issue and then develop an expertise in it. For example, it could be a great adventure to start at a small paper in Iowa and become an expert in telling stories of the evolution of agriculture because of such issues as global trade, federal subsidies, the use of ethanol. It would also be fascinating to go to the Mexican border, learn Spanish, and write about the turbulent interface between the two countries and cultures, developing an understanding of immigration along the way. Of course, such a job might not be possible for a young person who finishes college with a lot of debt strapped to his or her back. But those who don't carry that load should see the world, have adventures, take a few knocks, become a more complete reporter, citizen, human being. That will help them avoid the narrowness and self-importance of too many young products of the intern culture. Having taken that knock, I'd need to add that I've seen some first-rate people take the multiple-internship route. But my bias is for those who have a broader imagination and sense of adventure.

41 comments:

  1. Wonderful, reasoned comments. Did slip into a bit of a rant, and I sure wouldn't go nearly as far, but much does come down to the issue of the excesses of capitalism. Probably the crucial issue for all of us.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The article: Ben "Systemic Risk" Bernanke proves that Bernanke knowingly maintained a strict monetary policy long after he knew of the sub prime problem as he knew it would cause of the "Depression".

    It shows that he probably engineered it on purpose!

    If you want to sleep tonight, Don't Read It!

    "In contradiction to the prevalent view of the time, that money and monetary policy played at most a purely passive role in the Depression, Friedman and Schwartz argued that "the [economic] contraction is in fact a tragic testimonial to the importance of monetary forces" (Friedman and Schwartz, 1963, p. 300).
    .....

    The slowdown in economic activity, together with high interest rates, was in all likelihood the most important source of the stock market crash that followed in October.

    In other words, the market crash, rather than being the cause of the Depression, as popular legend has it, was in fact largely the result of an economic slowdown and the inappropriate monetary policies that preceded it.

    Of course, the stock market crash only worsened the economic situation, hurting consumer and business confidence and contributing to a still deeper downturn in 1930."


    Governor Ben S. Bernanke
    Money, Gold, and the Great Depression.
    At the H. Parker Willis Lecture in Economic Policy, Washington and Lee University,
    Lexington, Virginia.
    March 2nd, 2004


    You can read also: Preparing for the Crash, The Age of Turbulence Update: 27/07/09., which tries to accomplish Greenspan Mission Impossible:


    "That is mission impossible. Indeed, the international financial community has made numerous efforts in recent years to establish such oversight, but none prevented or ameliorated the crisis that began last summer.

    Much as we might wish otherwise, policy makers cannot reliably anticipate financial or economic shocks or the consequences of economic imbalances.

    Financial crises are characterised by discontinuous breaks in market pricing the timing of which by definition must be unanticipated - if people see them coming, then the markets arbitrage them away.

    ...

    The clear evidence of underpricing of risk did not prod private sector risk management to tighten the reins.

    In retrospect, it appears that the most market-savvy managers, although conscious that they were taking extraordinary risks, succumbed to the concern that unless they continued to "get up and dance", as ex-Citigroup CEO Chuck Prince memorably put it, they would irretrievably lose market share.

    Instead, they gambled that they could keep adding to their risky positions and still sell them out before the deluge. Most were wrong."


    Alan Greenspan
    The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World [Economic Order?].


    The Age of Turbulence: Plea for a New World Economic Order. explains the nature and causes of economic depressions and proposes a plausible alternative solution.

    ReplyDelete
  3. While Mr. Kammer's comments on politics and capitalism are callow and ill-informed, and he holds a rather idealistic view of an era of newspaper ownership that never really existed, he has put his finger on a key issue related to the decline of newspapers. Corporate ownership is among the top three or four causes of decline, and not for the reasons he cites. Family owners have shown themselves every bit as capable of greed, caprice and questionable ethics as corporate owners. Some private owners have done a marvelous job of running their papers right into the ground. Some corporate owners provided tremendous funding for the kind of journalism we presume Mr. Kammer finds most noble, often to a much greater extent than could be found among family owners. In other words, the world isn't as black and white -- both in newspapers and economics -- as Mr. Kammer would lead us to believe.

    ReplyDelete
  4. When people like this advocate Marxism I have a strong inclination to see it tried out on them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am New To Blogging And Found this Article really Worthy. I Visit many pages of your Blog. And learn many things from these Article. thanks for this Great Article.


    r4i software

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is great do you have a catologue if so I would love one to share with friends and family.
    IPL 2016 Teams Players list
    Vivo IPL 2016 Auction Date Time

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hello, I just loved reading your article. Also Visit my blog for Gujarat Lions Squad for IPL 2016.
    Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
  8. You’ve written nice post, I am gonna bookmark this page, thanks for info. I actually appreciate your own position and I will be sure to come back here.
    mortal kombat x, a10, roblox, color switch online

    ReplyDelete
  9. this is one of the cult game now, a lot of people enjoy playing them . Also you can refer to the game :
    age of war | red ball | earn to die 5 | Tank trouble | happy wheels | earn to die 6
    The game controls are shown just under . Movement mechanisms primarily include acceleration and tilting controls.
    tank trouble unblocked | wings io | strike force heroes | age of war | hotmail login

    ReplyDelete
  10. Guys now I am going to tell you how to choose a trendy and creative jack o lantern for your pumpkins.

    Korean Dramas

    Japanese Dramas

    Chinese Dramas

    Eng Sub

    Episode Dramas

    ReplyDelete